Crappy things about iTunes & iPods

Note: This post might be a little dated. It was published in February 2007.

Now I’m a Mac lover, but there are some things about iTunes and iPods that drive me nuts.

  • When you’re listening to your ipod and a crappy song comes on, there is no option to trash it.
  • If you import a CD when your computer is offline, it gives the tracks generic names (“track 1, track 2″ etc), and then they stay like that. This isn’t very helpful. What it should do is watch out for when you are next online, and then get the real song names off Gracenote in the background, without requiring any intervention from you.
  • Podcasts are listed under Albums. A podcast is not an album.
  • iTunes doesn’t do anything intelligent with tags. It doesn’t parse tags for similarities (e.g. “BobDylan” and “Bob Dylan” are obviously the same artist), and it doesn’t try to improve them with any social webby magic either.
  • It copes badly with compilation CDs. You end up with hundreds of artists listed (e.g. itunes puts a song by “Javis Cocker & Thom Yorke” in its own artist category, rather than listing it twice: under “Jarvis Cocker” and under “Thom Yorke”). And if you have one 4 minute song by an artist, it lists it as an album when you browse by album on your iPod.
  • iTunes expects you to make your own playlists. I hate making playlists, but I want something better than “random-everything” or the crappy smartplaylists that come preloaded when you install iTunes.
  • iTunes thinks it owns your bandwidth. When it starts downloading two big podcasts simultaneously (which it often does), your web browsing experience slows right down. It should throttle itself!
  • iTunes thinks it owns all the audio on your computer, and always tries to put things into your music library. So if you double click a music file, iTunes will load itself and automatically move that file into your music library. I hate that.

I know there are work-arounds for many of the things I’ve listed here, but that’s my point – that they are work-arounds. You have to think, tinker, learn, try out alternatives, and become a mini-expert. Some of us don’t want to!

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